Posts Tagged “St. Louis”

Shownotes 215 – From the Irish Roots Cafe
Irish in America, part 6, audio edition.

Audio Edition of the First Book on the Missouri Irish.
The Original History, with genealogical notes,
by Michael C. O’Laughlin, as read by Molly Nickle

Part 6 – History of The St. Patricks Day Parade
Todays Blog contains a few notes from the author
about the podcast which can be heard at:
http://www.irishroots.com/podcast/podcast215.mp3

The hardcopy edition of this book is at Amazon and:
http://www.irishroots.com/id4263.htm

St. Patricks Day Parades

When I began the research for this book back in 1982,
very little was generally known of the St. Patricks Day
parades west of the Mississippi. A few folks knew that there
were Parades from ‘way back when’ but few had any idea
just when the Parades began.

First Parades
I soon found the parades dated back to the 1820’s
at least, in St. Louis. Then I found the earliest record
of a parade in Kansas City in 1872, in the K.C. TImes.
It was described as the ‘Grandest’ of events. In that
era we find several competing grand Balls; Torchlight
parades; Bonfire celebrations; and literary events.

Groups
The parade lineups often published in the newspaper
give clues as to what was happening in those days.
The Shamrock Society was spoken of as the old folks.
The Hibernians were a group of younger folks, who,
in the end would be the sole survivors in the 20th century.

Individuals
A few individuals are even mentioned from time to
time in the news articles about St. Patricks Day. This
might be of interest to genealogists. I’ve seen most
Irish names in the want ads however, or in ads for
and about work crews.

End of the Parade
We see that cold temperatures shortened the parade
on occasion in the 1880’s. By the 1891 the parade was
strongly led, with a crowd of 5000 in the parade, headed
by the Hibernians. Political problems also brought things
to a halt for awhile.
By 1910 the reports are more sober, saying that the Irish
citizens celebrated in a ‘sensible’ manner. The parade
would disappear, and by the 1980’s few knew that the
parade had gone on 100 years ago!

Buchannan County
I also make a few notes on the Irish in St. Joseph and
Buchannan County in this episode. Of some note, the
Pendergast family arrived in St. Joseph in 1857, and
would later come to dominate in Kansas City.

(end of audio book part 6)
________________________________________
Irish Genealogy; History; Song; Language
Mike O’Laughlin publishes a complete collection of:
Irish Genealogy and History Books; Podcasts;
Blogs; Videos & Song. Here they are:

http://www.Irishroots.com/

________________________________________
The above are just a few notes on todays audio.

Listen to our free broadcast Today:
On Irishroots.com at:
http://www.irishroots.com/podcast/podcast215.mp3
on iTunes at:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=196090855

For all of our podcast channels
see the iTunes Irish Provider Page (click below):
http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewArtist?id=299857025
___________________________________________

Contact Us
You can reach the Irish Roots Cafe on Twitter; Facebook;
www.IrishRoots.com; and by mail at our U.S. location:

The Irish Roots Cafe
Box 7575
Kansas City, Missouri 64116

Sponsors Welcome. Our Workshops and band
appearances are available, and keep us thriving !
Remember to keep the hedgerow growing –
with your donation, subscription or membership.
– Thank you, Mike O’Laughlin

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Podcast 213 – From the Irish Roots Cafe
Irish in America, part 5, audio edition.
Audio Run Time: 1:09 from www.Irishroots.com

Todays Blog contains a few notes from my free audio book
podcast which will soon be posted at:
http://www.irishroots.com/podcast/podcast213.mp3

The hardcopy edition of this book is at Amazon and:
http://www.irishroots.com/id4263.htm

Audio Edition of the First Book on the Missouri Irish.
The Original History, with genealogical notes,
by Michael C. O’Laughlin, as read by Molly Nickle:

More Famine Irish; The Murphy Wagon,
Fr. Donnelly; Kansas City Irish settlements

I opened this section of the book,
“Joseph Murphy left town and climbed the fabled Indian Mound,
pondering his dilemma. He had arrived in St. Louis, parentless
at the age of 13, and built up a small wagon trade..”

Joseph Murphy
Todays excerpt covers the arrival of Joseph Murphy
as a young boy from County Louth. He became an
amazing success, his company building thousands
of wagons for the westward movement in America.

Abandoned
He was supposed to be greeted by family members
but they had left for parts unknown. So, he was
on his own when he arrived. I remember researching
the records looking for names of the Irish workers
on his wagons, but it seems there were more Germans
than Irish. The Irish worked well when they came
to work, but may have been a bit independent, so
the work force was primarily German according to
my sources.

illustrations
We also find 30 illustrations or more, from my
collection on the Irish in Missouri, including
the famous and infamous, maps and extracts.
I think Molly reads the list of illustrations on
the audio, but of course, we could not show them.

Irish in Kansas City
I then moved on to the Irish in Kansas City, virgin
territory when I started to research this book.
The early settlers are included, and of course, the
Fr. Donnelly saga, along with the story of the
first parades in the 1800’s and who was in them!
The Shamrock Society and the Hibernians were
the first organizations of record in the 1800’s.

First K.C. newspaper
St. Louis had its first two newspapers published
by Irishmen, and now we find the first was
printed by Kennedy in Kansas City. The name
of the paper was The Kansas Public Ledger
in 1851 when it first came out, and it was
published near the River in what is Kansas
City Missouri today. I think it was on Water
Street, which no longer exists.

Politics
Irish politics are always present, and there
were plenty in Kansas City. People complained
of the Irish controlling the city back in the
1870’s, and I included some quotes from the
papers of the day on that…work crews also
held many Irish names as listed in the paper.

The above are just a few tidbits from the book,
and you can listen to it on my podcast or hear
all 7 hours of ‘Missouri Irish’ on our CD.

Next is part 6, which covers the St. Patricks
Day Parades.
Then it is part 7, for the Irish Wilderness
settlement and Father Hogan.
Finishing with part 8commentary:
‘My Irish American Heritage’
Sullivan, Donahue, Buckley, Kelliher Cork, Kerry,
Civil War, Iowa, Missouri… Special guest reading
by Patricia Donahue (O’Laughlin)

Listen to our free broadcast to be posted at:
On Irishroots.com at:
http://www.irishroots.com/podcast/podcast213.mp3
on iTunes at:
http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=196090855

For all of our podcast channels
see the iTunes Irish Provider Page (click below):
http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewArtist?id=299857025
___________________________________________

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___________________________________________

Contact Us
You can reach the Irish Roots Cafe on Twitter; Facebook;
www.IrishRoots.com; and by mail at our U.S. location:

The Irish Roots Cafe
Box 7575
Kansas City, Missouri 64116

Sponsors Welcome. Our Workshops and band
appearances are available, and keep us thriving !
Remember to keep the hedgerow growing –
with your donation, subscription or membership.
– Thank you, Mike O’Laughlin

Comments Comments Off